Sufism, also known as Tasawwuf, is a mystical form of Islam that emphasizes spiritual growth and inner purification. Its origins can be traced back to the early days of Islam, with its practices and beliefs influenced by various sources such as the Quran, Hadith, and the teachings of early Islamic scholars. Sufism has played a significant role in the development of Islamic culture and has produced many influential thinkers and poets, including Rumi, Ibn Arabi, and Attar. In this article, we will explore the origins of Sufism and its influence on Islamic culture, delving into the timeless teachings and practices that have made it a beloved tradition for millions of people around the world. Join us on this journey as we uncover the mystical roots of Sufism and discover the rich history and cultural significance of this timeless tradition.

The Historical and Cultural Context of Sufism’s Emergence

The Birthplace of Sufism: Arabia and the Early Islamic World

The Desert Nomads of Arabia

Sufism emerged in the Arabian Peninsula, where nomadic tribes roamed the vast deserts, their lives deeply connected to the rhythms of nature. It was within this harsh and unforgiving environment that the spiritual quest of these early Sufis found fertile ground. The desert’s isolation and austerity encouraged introspection, contemplation, and a profound longing for transcendence.

The Formative Years of Islam

The birthplace of Sufism coincided with the formative years of Islam, during the first few centuries after the Prophet Muhammad’s teachings spread across the Arabian Peninsula. This historical context played a crucial role in shaping the development of Sufism. Islamic theology, with its emphasis on spiritual purification and closeness to God, provided a foundation for the mystical aspirations of the early Sufis.

The Early Sufis: Seekers of Truth

The early Sufis were seekers of truth, who sought to deepen their understanding of Islamic teachings and to live a life of greater spiritual meaning. They embraced the belief that the ultimate goal of human existence was to achieve a direct experience of the divine. These early Sufis, such as Al-Hasan Al-Basri and Rabia Basri, were not only revered scholars but also beloved spiritual guides, whose wisdom and teachings continue to inspire Sufis to this day.

The Role of Poetry and Music

The cultural milieu of Arabia during the emergence of Sufism was rich in poetry and music, which played a vital role in expressing the emotional and spiritual aspects of the Sufi experience. The early Sufis found in poetry and music powerful tools for expressing their mystical experiences and for communicating the subtleties of their spiritual journey to others. This artistic tradition has continued to flourish within Sufism, with many of the greatest Sufi poets, such as Rumi and Hafiz, leaving behind a legacy of poetic masterpieces that still resonate with Sufis today.

The Influence of Christian and Jewish Mysticism

The birthplace of Sufism was also home to various Christian and Jewish communities, with whom the early Sufis interacted and from whom they drew spiritual inspiration. This exchange of ideas and spiritual practices helped to enrich the early Sufi tradition, incorporating elements of Jewish mysticism, such as the Kabbalah, and Christian mysticism, such as the teachings of St. John of the Cross.

In conclusion, the birthplace of Sufism, Arabia and the early Islamic world, provided a unique historical and cultural context that nurtured the development of this timeless spiritual tradition. The desert nomads, the formative years of Islam, the early Sufis, poetry and music, and the influence of other mystical traditions all played a crucial role in shaping the spiritual path that continues to guide Sufis to this day.

The Interplay between Sufism and Other Religious and Philosophical Traditions

The Influence of Islamic Teachings

Sufism emerged within the Islamic world, and its development was heavily influenced by Islamic teachings. Early Sufis sought to deepen their understanding of Islam by studying the Quran and the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad. They believed that the mystical dimension of Islam could lead to a closer relationship with God and a more profound understanding of the faith. As a result, Sufism has always been considered an integral part of Islam, even though some Muslims have criticized it for being too mystical and not strictly following the teachings of the Prophet.

The Influence of Christian Mysticism

Another significant influence on Sufism was Christian mysticism, which was introduced to the Islamic world through trade and cultural exchange. Sufis were drawn to the works of Christian mystics such as St. Augustine and St. John of the Cross, and they saw similarities between the mystical experiences described in these works and their own experiences. They also incorporated elements of Christian mysticism into their own practices, such as the use of the heart as a symbol of the divine.

The Influence of Hinduism and Buddhism

Sufism has also been influenced by Hinduism and Buddhism, particularly in terms of its emphasis on spiritual practices such as meditation and asceticism. Some Sufis have even traveled to India to study with Hindu and Buddhist mystics, and they have incorporated elements of these traditions into their own practices. For example, the concept of the “Perfect Man” or “Prophet of God” is shared by both Sufism and some forms of Hinduism and Buddhism.

The Interplay between Sufism and Philosophy

Finally, Sufism has also been influenced by various philosophical traditions, such as Neoplatonism and Pythagoreanism. Sufis have incorporated ideas from these traditions into their own philosophy, such as the concept of the “unity of existence” and the idea that the material world is a manifestation of the divine. Sufis have also been influenced by the works of Ibn Rushd (Averroes), a Muslim philosopher who lived in the 12th century and whose ideas were widely studied in both the Islamic and European worlds.

Overall, the interplay between Sufism and other religious and philosophical traditions has been a crucial factor in its development. Sufis have drawn on the teachings of Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, and philosophy to deepen their understanding of the mystical dimension of existence and to develop their own practices and teachings. This interplay has enriched Sufism and has helped to make it a timeless culture that continues to inspire seekers of truth from all over the world.

The Life and Teachings of Sufism’s Founding Figures

Key takeaway: Sufism, the mystical dimension of Islam, has its roots in the Arabian Peninsula during the early Islamic era. It emerged as a response to the spiritual needs of the nomadic tribes of Arabia and was heavily influenced by Islamic teachings, as well as other religious and philosophical traditions such as Christian mysticism, Hinduism and Buddhism, and Neoplatonism and Pythagoreanism. The influence of Sufism on Islamic art, literature, and music is deeply intertwined with the culture’s mystical roots. Over time, Sufism has spread throughout the Islamic world and has had a profound impact on the Western spiritual quest. Today, Sufism faces challenges in preserving its spiritual legacy in the face of globalization and secularism, but many Sufis are working to adapt to the changing world while preserving their spiritual legacy.

Prophet Muhammad and the Seeding of Sufi Ideas

Prophet Muhammad, the founder of Islam, played a crucial role in the development of Sufism. While Sufism is often considered a separate school of thought within Islam, it is rooted in the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad.

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Many of the key concepts and practices of Sufism can be traced back to the life and teachings of the Prophet Muhammad. For example, the importance of compassion, love, and forgiveness were central to his message. He also emphasized the importance of personal spiritual growth and the cultivation of a close relationship with God.

In addition to his teachings, the Prophet Muhammad’s life also provides valuable insights into the Sufi path. He is seen as a model of spiritual excellence, and his actions and behavior are often studied by Sufis as a guide for their own spiritual journey.

Furthermore, the Prophet Muhammad’s relationship with his companions is also seen as a key aspect of Sufism. Many of the stories and anecdotes about his interactions with his companions are rich with spiritual meaning and provide valuable lessons for those on the Sufi path.

Overall, the teachings and example of the Prophet Muhammad played a significant role in the development of Sufism, and continue to be a source of inspiration and guidance for Sufis today.

Abu-Nuwas: The Poet and Sufi Scholar of the Early Islamic Era

Abu-Nuwas, also known as Abu al-Qasim al-Humaidi, was a poet and Sufi scholar who lived during the early Islamic era. He was born in the city of Basra, located in present-day Iraq, in the year 750 CE. Abu-Nuwas was a prolific writer, and his works were instrumental in shaping the development of Sufism.

Abu-Nuwas was known for his devotion to the path of spirituality and his dedication to the study of Islamic mysticism. He was deeply influenced by the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad and sought to understand the inner meaning of Islamic teachings. His poetry often explored themes of love, spirituality, and the search for truth.

One of Abu-Nuwas’ most famous works is his collection of poetry known as “The Seven Songs.” This collection is considered a masterpiece of Sufi literature and contains poems that explore the themes of love, spirituality, and the search for truth. The poems in “The Seven Songs” are written in the form of a conversation between the poet and God, and they reflect Abu-Nuwas’ deep understanding of the inner meaning of Islamic teachings.

Abu-Nuwas was also known for his association with other Sufi scholars and poets of his time. He was a close friend of the Sufi scholar and poet al-Junayd, and the two are said to have spent many hours in deep conversation about the nature of spirituality and the path to enlightenment.

Despite his contributions to Sufism, Abu-Nuwas’ life was not without controversy. He was known for his unconventional lifestyle and his criticism of the religious establishment of his time. This led to him being ostracized by some members of the religious community, and he was even imprisoned for a time.

Overall, Abu-Nuwas was a key figure in the development of Sufism, and his contributions to the tradition continue to be studied and appreciated to this day. His poetry and teachings offer a unique perspective on the nature of spirituality and the path to enlightenment, and they continue to inspire and guide seekers on the Sufi path.

Sufism’s Transformation: From Mysticism to a Fully-Fledged Spiritual Tradition

The Role of Islamic Mystics in the Development of Sufism

The emergence of Sufism as a distinct spiritual tradition is closely linked to the role of Islamic mystics, who played a crucial part in its development. These mystics, known as Sufis, were deeply committed to exploring the inner dimensions of Islam and sought to understand the meaning of divine love and devotion.

Islamic mystics, who were often referred to as “people of the heart,” emphasized the importance of personal spiritual experiences and direct access to God. They rejected the formalistic and legalistic approach to Islam that was prevalent during their time, instead focusing on the inner dimensions of faith and the purification of the soul.

One of the key figures in the development of Sufism was Hasan of Basra, who lived in the 7th century. Hasan was a Sufi mystic who emphasized the importance of self-discipline, asceticism, and the purification of the soul. He believed that true knowledge of God could only be achieved through direct personal experience, and he encouraged his followers to engage in a rigorous spiritual discipline in order to attain this goal.

Another important figure in the development of Sufism was Rabia al-Basri, who lived in the 8th century. Rabia was a female Sufi mystic who emphasized the importance of divine love and devotion. She believed that the path to spiritual enlightenment lay in the purification of the heart and the cultivation of love for God.

Over time, the teachings of these and other Islamic mystics became increasingly influential, and Sufism began to develop as a distinct spiritual tradition. Sufis emphasized the importance of personal spiritual experiences and direct access to God, and they developed a range of practices and techniques designed to help individuals achieve this goal. These included meditation, asceticism, and the cultivation of divine love and devotion.

In addition to their focus on personal spiritual experiences, Sufis also placed a strong emphasis on social and ethical responsibility. They believed that true spiritual enlightenment could only be achieved through a deep commitment to moral and ethical behavior, and they emphasized the importance of compassion, generosity, and service to others.

Overall, the role of Islamic mystics in the development of Sufism cannot be overstated. Their commitment to exploring the inner dimensions of faith and their emphasis on personal spiritual experiences and ethical responsibility helped to shape Sufism into the rich and vibrant spiritual tradition that it is today.

The Influence of Sufism on the Formation of Islamic Art, Literature, and Music

Sufism and Islamic Art

Sufism’s influence on Islamic art is deeply intertwined with the culture’s mystical roots. This impact is evident in various art forms, such as calligraphy, miniature painting, and architecture. Sufi artists often used their work as a means of spiritual expression, conveying the beauty and spiritual depth of their faith.

  1. Calligraphy: Sufi calligraphers elevated the art of writing to a spiritual level. They used calligraphy as a means of meditation and to express the divine nature of the Quranic text. The intricate and fluid style of Sufi calligraphy became a symbol of spiritual growth and enlightenment.
  2. Miniature Painting: Sufi miniature paintings, often depicting scenes from Sufi literature or the lives of Sufi saints, showcase the spiritual and emotional aspects of the faith. These paintings, with their vivid colors and intricate details, provide a visual representation of the mystical experiences described in Sufi poetry and teachings.

Sufism and Islamic Literature

Sufism has had a profound impact on Islamic literature, particularly in the development of spiritual poetry and prose. Many famous Sufi poets, such as Rumi, Hafiz, and Attar, have left an indelible mark on the literary landscape of the Islamic world.

  1. Sufi Poetry: Sufi poetry is a testament to the mystical dimension of Islam. Poets such as Rumi and Hafiz used their poetry to express their love for the divine and to convey the essence of Sufi teachings. These poems, rich in symbolism and imagery, have captivated readers for centuries and continue to inspire spiritual seekers today.
  2. Sufi Prose: Sufi philosophers and scholars, like Al-Ghazali and Ibn Arabi, have contributed significantly to Islamic literature. Their works, focusing on topics such as the nature of God, the spiritual path, and the role of the Sufi teacher, have shaped the intellectual and spiritual development of generations of Muslims.
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Sufism and Islamic Music

Sufism has played a vital role in the development of Islamic music, with the genre known as Qawwali being one of the most well-known examples. Qawwali is a devotional music form that originated in India and Pakistan, and it has become synonymous with Sufism.

  1. Qawwali: Qawwali is a form of Sufi music that is often performed during Sufi gatherings and ceremonies. The music, characterized by its emotional and rhythmic qualities, is meant to evoke a spiritual experience and facilitate a connection with the divine. Qawwali songs often include lyrics that express love and longing for the beloved, who is seen as a metaphor for the divine.
  2. Other Forms of Sufi Music: Sufi music is also found in other parts of the Islamic world, with variations in style and instrumentation. In North Africa, for example, Sufi music is characterized by the use of the oud, a stringed instrument, and the riq, a frame drum. In West Africa, the influence of Sufism can be heard in the music of the Gnawa, who use spiritual chants and hypnotic rhythms to induce a trance-like state during their ceremonies.

By examining the impact of Sufism on the formation of Islamic art, literature, and music, we can gain a deeper understanding of the timeless cultural

Sufism’s Global Reach: From the Middle East to the West

The Spread of Sufism throughout the Islamic World

Sufism, often referred to as the mystical dimension of Islam, has its roots in the Middle East. Over time, it has spread throughout the Islamic world, transcending cultural and geographical boundaries. This section will delve into the various ways Sufism has disseminated across the Islamic world, highlighting its adaptability and enduring appeal.

The Early Spread of Sufism

The earliest spread of Sufism occurred during the first few centuries after the emergence of Islam. As Islamic scholars and mystics sought to deepen their understanding of the faith, they embarked on spiritual journeys to distant lands, sharing their knowledge and experiences with local communities. These journeys played a crucial role in the spread of Sufism across the Islamic world, fostering a sense of unity and shared spiritual heritage among diverse populations.

Sufi Orders and Their Influence

The establishment of Sufi orders, or tarikas, has been instrumental in the spread of Sufism. These orders served as platforms for the transmission of Sufi teachings, rituals, and practices, as well as providing a support network for Sufi mystics. Prominent Sufi orders, such as the Naqshbandi, Qadiri, and Chishti orders, have left a lasting impact on the Islamic world, with followers found in various regions from India to Africa and beyond.

Sufi Literature and its Role in Dissemination

Sufi literature has played a significant role in the spread of Sufism, as it allows for the preservation and transmission of Sufi teachings and practices across time and space. Sufi poets and mystics have composed numerous works, including poetry, treatises, and hagiographies, which have inspired generations of Sufis and non-Sufis alike. Notable Sufi poets such as Rumi, Hafez, and Ibn Arabi have had a profound impact on the Islamic world, transcending cultural and linguistic barriers to communicate the essence of Sufism.

Sufism in the Modern Era

In the modern era, Sufism has continued to spread throughout the Islamic world, adapting to the changing needs and contexts of diverse communities. While traditional Sufi practices and rituals remain central to many orders, contemporary Sufis have also embraced new forms of expression, such as music, dance, and digital media, to communicate the timeless message of Sufism to a global audience.

Overall, the spread of Sufism throughout the Islamic world is a testament to its enduring appeal and adaptability. By examining the various factors that have contributed to its dissemination, we gain a deeper understanding of the cultural, spiritual, and intellectual richness of this timeless tradition.

The Impact of Sufism on the Western Spiritual Quest

Sufism, the mystical dimension of Islam, has had a profound impact on the Western spiritual quest. This impact can be seen in various ways, from the influence of Sufi teachings on Western philosophers and poets to the spread of Sufi practices and rituals in the West.

The Influence of Sufi Teachings on Western Philosophers and Poets

Sufi teachings have had a significant influence on Western philosophers and poets, who have been drawn to the mystical and spiritual dimensions of Sufism. For example, the works of the Persian poet Rumi, who is widely regarded as the most famous Sufi poet, have been translated into many languages and have had a profound impact on Western spirituality. Similarly, the works of other Sufi poets such as Hafez and Attar have also been widely translated and studied in the West.

The Spread of Sufi Practices and Rituals in the West

In addition to the influence of Sufi teachings on Western philosophy and poetry, Sufi practices and rituals have also spread to the West. This has been facilitated by the growing interest in meditation and mindfulness practices, which have their roots in Sufism. Sufi practices such as breath control, meditation, and the recitation of sacred words and phrases have been adopted by many in the West as a means of achieving spiritual growth and inner peace.

The Appeal of Sufism to Western Seekers

The appeal of Sufism to Western seekers lies in its emphasis on the inner dimensions of spirituality, rather than on external forms and rituals. Sufism offers a path of spiritual growth that is accessible to people of all backgrounds and beliefs, and its teachings and practices have been embraced by many in the West as a means of achieving spiritual fulfillment.

In conclusion, the impact of Sufism on the Western spiritual quest has been significant and far-reaching. From the influence of Sufi teachings on Western philosophers and poets to the spread of Sufi practices and rituals in the West, Sufism has had a profound impact on the spiritual lives of many in the West. Its emphasis on the inner dimensions of spirituality and its universal appeal make it a timeless and enduring tradition that continues to inspire and guide seekers on their spiritual journeys.

Sufism in Modern Times: Preserving the Heritage while Adapting to the Contemporary World

The Challenges of Preserving Sufism’s Spiritual Legacy in the Face of Globalization and Secularism

In the modern era, Sufism faces significant challenges in preserving its spiritual legacy. The influence of globalization and secularism has led to the erosion of traditional Sufi practices and beliefs.

Loss of Cultural Identity

As globalization brings the world closer together, local cultures are being homogenized. This process threatens the unique cultural identity of Sufism, which has been shaped by centuries of historical and religious context.

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Dilution of Spiritual Practices

With the spread of Sufism to other parts of the world, there is a risk of dilution of its spiritual practices. This is particularly true in countries where Sufism is not the dominant religion, and practitioners may not fully understand the depth and complexity of its teachings.

Secularism and the Loss of Spiritual Influence

Secularism has led to a decline in religious influence in many parts of the world. This has resulted in a decline in the number of people seeking spiritual guidance from Sufi practitioners, making it more difficult for them to preserve their spiritual legacy.

Challenges of Modernization

The process of modernization has led to the erosion of traditional Sufi practices and beliefs. This is particularly true in urban areas, where traditional ways of life are being replaced by modern lifestyles.

Adapting to Change

Despite these challenges, many Sufis are working to adapt to the changing world while preserving their spiritual legacy. This involves finding new ways to connect with people and sharing the teachings of Sufism in a way that is relevant to contemporary life.

By recognizing the challenges faced by Sufism in the modern world, practitioners can work to preserve its spiritual legacy while adapting to the changing world around them.

The Revival of Sufism as a Force for Spiritual Growth and Social Harmony

  • Re-evaluation of Sufism’s Role in Modern Society
    • The growing interest in Sufism as a spiritual practice and source of wisdom
    • Recognition of its potential to foster unity and harmony in a diverse world
  • Sufi Orders and Communities in the Contemporary Era
    • Preservation of traditional practices and teachings
    • Adaptation to contemporary challenges and opportunities
    • Encouraging interfaith dialogue and cooperation
  • Sufism’s Influence on Art, Music, and Literature
    • Revival of Sufi poetry and music as expressions of spiritual devotion
    • Incorporation of Sufi themes in contemporary art and literature
    • Cross-cultural exchange and appreciation of Sufi artistic traditions
  • Sufism as a Bridge between Cultures and Faiths
    • Promoting understanding and respect among different religions
    • Encouraging spiritual growth and self-improvement
    • Serving as a catalyst for personal and societal transformation

The Future of Sufism: Embracing Diversity and Fostering Spiritual Unity

The Role of Sufism in Promoting Interfaith Dialogue and Understanding

Sufism as a Bridge between Religions

Sufism, with its mystical and spiritual dimensions, has the potential to act as a bridge between different religions. By emphasizing shared spiritual values and experiences, Sufism can foster understanding and respect among individuals from diverse religious backgrounds.

The Importance of Love and Compassion in Sufism

Sufism’s focus on love, compassion, and spiritual connection transcends religious boundaries, providing a common ground for interfaith dialogue. Through the shared experience of love and devotion, Sufism encourages people to recognize the common humanity that unites them, rather than focusing on the differences that may separate them.

The Role of Sufi Teachers and Scholars in Interfaith Dialogue

Sufi teachers and scholars have played a significant role in promoting interfaith dialogue and understanding. By engaging in intellectual and spiritual exchanges with representatives from other religions, they have helped to break down barriers and promote mutual respect and tolerance.

Sufism as a Source of Inspiration for Interfaith Cooperation

Sufism’s message of spiritual unity and its emphasis on the shared human experience can inspire individuals from different religious backgrounds to work together for the common good. By promoting values such as compassion, forgiveness, and selflessness, Sufism can serve as a catalyst for interfaith cooperation and understanding.

The Need for Sufism in Today’s World

In a world plagued by religious extremism and intolerance, the message of Sufism is more important than ever. By promoting interfaith dialogue and understanding, Sufism can help to create a more peaceful and harmonious world, where individuals from diverse religious backgrounds can live together in mutual respect and tolerance.

The Potential of Sufism to Inspire a New Generation of Spiritual Seekers

  • Embracing a Universal Language of Love and Compassion
    • Sufism’s Message of Love and Unity Transcends Cultural and Religious Boundaries
      • Sufism as a Bridge between East and West, Uniting People of Different Faiths and Backgrounds
      • The Power of Sufi Poetry and Music in Fostering Spiritual Unity
    • The Role of Sufism in Promoting Interfaith Dialogue and Understanding
      • Sufism as a Tool for Building Bridges between Islam and the West
      • The Potential of Sufism to Inspire a Global Movement of Interfaith Harmony
  • Rekindling the Flame of Mysticism in a Modern World
    • The Need for a Return to the Roots of Sufism in Today’s World
      • The Role of Sufism in Preserving the Essential Spirituality of Islam
      • The Potential of Sufism to Inspire a Renewal of Spirituality in the Muslim World
    • The Relevance of Sufism for Spiritual Seekers in the Modern Age
      • The Appeal of Sufism to a New Generation of Spiritual Seekers
      • The Potential of Sufism to Inspire a Revival of Mysticism in the Modern World
  • The Importance of Preserving the Oral Tradition of Sufism
    • The Need to Protect the Rich Heritage of Sufi Teachings and Practices
      • The Role of Sufi Orders in Preserving the Living Tradition of Sufism
      • The Importance of Transmitting the Wisdom of the Sufi Masters to Future Generations
    • The Challenges and Opportunities of Adapting Sufi Teachings to the Modern World
      • The Need to Contextualize Sufi Teachings for a Modern Audience
      • The Potential of Sufism to Inspire a New Vision of Spirituality for the 21st Century

FAQs

1. What is Sufism?

Sufism is a mystical form of Islam that emphasizes personal spiritual growth and direct experience of God. It is also known as Tasawwuf, and is considered to be the inner or esoteric dimension of Islam.

2. Where did Sufism originate?

Sufism originated in Arabia in the 8th century, during the early years of Islam. It developed as a response to the need for a deeper understanding of the spiritual dimension of Islam, and was influenced by various religious and philosophical traditions.

3. Who were the first Sufis?

The first Sufis were the companions of the Prophet Muhammad, who sought to understand the spiritual dimensions of Islam. They were known for their piety, asceticism, and devotion to God, and are considered to be the founders of Sufism.

4. What are some of the key beliefs and practices of Sufism?

Sufis believe in the oneness of God and the importance of direct personal experience of God. They also emphasize the importance of self-discipline, asceticism, and devotion, and practice various spiritual exercises such as meditation, music, and poetry.

5. How has Sufism influenced Islamic culture?

Sufism has had a profound influence on Islamic culture, shaping art, literature, music, and architecture. It has also played a significant role in the spread of Islam, and has been an important force in the development of Islamic civilization.

6. Is Sufism a sect or a school of thought within Islam?

Sufism is neither a sect nor a school of thought within Islam, but rather a mystical tradition that has been embraced by Muslims of all sects and schools of thought. It is considered to be the inner or esoteric dimension of Islam, and is practiced by millions of Muslims around the world.

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